An American bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA


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An American bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

A fully grown bison can weigh almost a tonne but can still run at a speed of 40 miles per hour.

Regarded as sacred to many Native American tribes, the bison’s sheer size and remarkable physical abilities probably inspired them to become symbols of strength and abundance. A fully grown bison can weigh almost a tonne but can still run at a speed of 40 miles per hour. Once counted in the tens of millions across the North American plains, bison were hunted nearly to extinction by European settlers in the 19th century. Through conservation efforts, the American bison rebounded from a low of fewer than 1,000 in the 1890s to roughly half a million today.

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